I’ve never been to Oregon, nor Washington and living in California I had to visit to learn more about what’s around my local break. I was very curious to see how conditions differed compared to my local break in Pacifica, CA. A lot of surfers say, Northern California is a difficult place to learn to surf. But if you can surf here, you can surf anywhere. I wanted to see if that was true.

A lot of surfers say, Northern California is a difficult place to learn how to surf. But if you can surf here, you can surf anywhere.

Driving past Mount Shasta and approaching the California/Oregon border I was pretty amazed by the change in landscape. From being in the snow and now a dry desolate desert, I stopped and explored a bit of the landscape at Klamath National Forest.

The Klamath National Forest encompasses nearly 1.7 million acres of land straddling the California and Oregon border. – Forest Service

Klamath National Forest, California

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Exploring Klamath National Forest reminded me of how small we really are. Think about our daily lives, we drive to work, we spend 8+ hours in an office, we drive home and maybe to the gym not more than 5 miles from home. The proximity of the space that we’re familiar with may be no more than 50 square miles. For instance, San Francisco is a small city I am quite familiar with and it’s measured 7 miles wide and 7 miles long at only 47.8 square miles. I rarely visit outside of my locality unless there’s a specific reason such as surfing, which I have visited most local breaks in the Bay Area.

Leaving Klamath National Forest and approaching Oregon, I felt like I was a conquistador adventuring and discovering new lands. But in my case, instead of gold, I was after clean beach breaks, heavenly waterfalls and romantic sunsets. I was excited and hesitant to see what I find.

If you are enjoying my story, be sure to leave a comment, like, or follow. Any feedback is appreciated. Also, feel free to follow on Instagram for a daily dose of adventure.

 

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